Monday, November 18, 2019

Literary Treks 288: The Golden Girls in Space

Star Trek: Destiny
Book II: Mere Mortals
by David Mack


Purchase Mere Mortals:
Mass-market paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk
E-book (Kindle): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk


The Destiny trilogy is also available in an omnibus containing all three parts!

Purchase:
Trade paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk
E-book (Kindle): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk



The Borg continue to threaten the Federation with extinction, and its up to the crews of the Enterprise, Aventine, and Titan to stop them! On New Erigol, the Titan crew find themselves stranded, at the mercy of the mysterious Caelier and their centuries-old companion, Captain Erika Hernandez of the Columbia. Meanwhile, the Enterprise and Aventine explore the subspace tunnels that fill the Azure Nebula. Will they be able to determine which of them the Borg are using to enter Federation space and close it in time?

In this episode of Literary Treks, hosts Dan Gunther and Bruce Gibson discus the second book in the Destiny trilogy by David Mack: Mere Mortals. We talk about the Enterprise and Aventine's attempts to scout the subspace tunnels, the plight of the Titan crew, Captain Hernandez's experiences with the Caeliar, President Bacco's attempts to win the Federation allies in their struggle against the Borg, Pazlar and Ra-Havreii's psychological issues, Deanna's ill-fated pregnancy, the shocking ending, and wrap up with our final thoughts.

At the top of the show, we respond to listener feedback from The Babel Conference for Literary Treks 286: The Wrong Thing for the Right Reason.


Literary Treks 288: The Golden Girls in Space
Destiny, Book II: Mere Mortals by David Mack





Previous episode: Literary Treks 287: Fear Usually Leads to Chaos
Next episode: Literary Treks 289: Destiny, Book III: Lost Souls

Monday, November 11, 2019

Literary Treks 287: Fear Usually Leads to Chaos

Star Trek: Destiny
Book I: Gods of Night
by David Mack


Purchase:
Mass-market paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

E-book (Kindle): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk


The Destiny trilogy is also available in an omnibus containing all three parts!

Purchase:
Trade paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk
E-book (Kindle): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk



As an apocalyptic Borg attack on the Federation begins, the crews of Starfleet's finest starships must rise to the occasion to defend everything they know and love. Meanwhile, the crashed wreck of the Starship Columbia may hold the key to explaining the Borg's vengeful invasion of the Federation. What happened 200 years ago that caused Columbia to crash, and how did it end up in the Gamma Quadrant?

In this episode of Literary Treks, hosts Bruce Gibson and Dan Gunther are joined by The 602 Club's Matthew Rushing to discuss the first book in the Destiny trilogy by David Mack: Gods of Night. We talk about the mystery of the Columbia, the actions of the MACOs that led to her destruction, the mysterious Caeliar, Picard & Crusher's story, Riker & Troi on the Titan, an emotional moment for one of the Voyager crew, the cliffhanger ending, and wrap up with our final thoughts and ratings.

In the news segment, we report on four new hardcover books announced at Destination Star Trek Birmingham: The Art of Star Trek: Discovery by Paula M. Block & Terry J. Erdmann, Star Trek: Voyager: A Celebration by Ben Robinson, The Autobiography of Kathryn Janeway "edited" by Una McCormack, and The Artistry of Dan Curry by Dan Curry & Ben Robinson. We also review issue #7 of Star Trek: Year Five and respond to feedback from the Babel Conference for Literary Treks 285: Those Bloody Mind Control Revolts! 


Literary Treks 287: Fear Usually Leads to Chaos
Star Trek: Destiny, Book I: Gods of Night by David Mack





Previous episode: Literary Treks 286: The Wrong Thing for the Right Reason
Next episode: Literary Treks 288: The Golden Girls in Space

Friday, November 1, 2019

Gods of Night

Star Trek: Destiny
Book I: Gods of Night by David Mack
Published September 2008
Read October 28th 2019

Previous book (Post-Nemesis Continuity): The Next Generation: Greater Than the Sum
Next book (Post-Nemesis Continuity): Destiny, Book II: Mere Mortals


Purchase:
Mass-market paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

E-book (Kindle): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

The Destiny trilogy is also available in an omnibus containing all three parts!

Purchase:
Trade paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk
E-book (Kindle): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

Spoilers ahead for Gods of Night!

From the back cover:
Half a decade after the Dominion War and more than a year after the rise and fall of Praetor Shinzon, the galaxy's greatest scourge returns to wreak havoc upon the Federation -- and this time its goal is nothing less than total annihilation.

Elsewhere, deep in the Gamma Quadrant, an ancient mystery is solved. One of Earth's first generation of starships, lost for centuries, has been found dead and empty on a desolate planet. But its discovery so far from home has raised disturbing questions, and the answers harken back to a struggle for survival that once tested a captain and her crew to the limits of their humanity.

From that terrifying flashpoint begins an apocalyptic odyssey that will reach across time and space to reveal the past, define the future, and show three captains -- Jean-Luc Picard of the U.S.S. Enterprise, William Riker of the U.S.S. Titan, and Ezri Dax of the U.S.S Aventine -- that some destinies are inescapable.

My thoughts:

More than any other story line in the Star Trek literary universe, Destiny has impacted the current state of Star Trek novels. Although the word has been overused in recent years, Destiny is nothing short of epic. A story that spans generations, with a tragic event for the crew of the Columbia in the 22nd century, and an apocalyptic Borg invasion in the 24th, Destiny ties together the whole of Trek history into one incredibly intricate and compelling story.

In this, the first novel of the trilogy, the various pieces are moved onto the chess board, setting things up for the huge story to come. In the 22nd century, a battle with the Romulans at the outbreak of the Earth/Romulan War leaves the Columbia crippled and out of contact with Starfleet. With no alternatives, Captain Erika Hernandez sets a course for the nearest habitable planet and pushes Columbia's impulse engines to relativistic speeds - the warp drive is offline. Upon arriving at the planet they discover is called Erigol, the inhabitants - a species calling themselves the Caeliar - informs the landing party that they will not be allowed to leave the surface, and the orbiting Columbia will not be permitted to leave.

The novel alternates between the Columbia crew in the 22nd century and the crews of a number of starships in the 24th century. Of course, on the front line of the battle against the Borg is Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew of the Enterprise. Outfitted with transphasic torpedoes (see: Voyager's "Endgame"), the Enterprise is assigned to determine how and where the Borg are entering Federation space. Meanwhile, the U.S.S. Aventine under the command of Ezri Dax is investigating the crashed wreck of the Columbia, which has somehow wound up in the Gamma Quadrant. The third 24th-century starship the story follows is Captain Riker's U.S.S. Titan, which finds itself far beyond the borders of the Federation investigating a strange, seemingly artificial star system.

This image, "Last Flight of the Columbia," from Ships of the Line, was the inspiration for much of this story for David Mack.

Interspersed with the huge, epic narrative of the battle against the Borg are smaller, human stories that serve to remind the reader just what it is the characters are fighting for. Picard and Crusher have a child on the way, which causes Jean-Luc to reflect on what kind of universe their child will be born into. Riker and Troi are having difficulties in conceiving a child, and Troi makes what some would see as reckless decisions regarding her nonviable pregnancy. And in the flashback sequences, the crew of the Columbia, imprisoned on Erigol, deal with their fate in a variety of ways.

One of the big themes that comes out of the novel is the idea of fear as the impetus for much of the story: the Caeliar fear outside contact, so they do not allow the Columbia crew to leave. Major Foyle, the head of the Columbia's MACO contingent, fears never returning home and takes drastic steps to secure their freedom. All the while, they are setting in motion events that will shape the future not only for themselves, but for the entire galaxy.

Some may feel that the whole "Federation in peril" story has been overdone. However, it has never been done quite like this. The future that Picard sees when he hears the Borg in his head is nothing short of apocalyptic. The Federation is being brought to its knees in a way it never has before, and while those who have read the entire trilogy know how it will all turn out, at this point the outcome appears bleak to say the least. This is the ultimate test of the Federation, and even someone as strong as Jean-Luc Picard at times seems resigned to the fact that the Federation will fail.

All of these elements will eventually come together, but for now, they are all mostly set up for what is to come. Eventually, we learn of the fate of the Caeliar, and how members of the Columbia crew contributed to the cataclysm that befell them. At the end of the novel, an away team from Titan investigates a planet surrounded by an artificial shell. A familiar figure greets them: former Captain Erika Hernandez of the Starship Columbia, who welcomes them to "New Erigol."

Final thoughts:

This is an incredibly strong start to the Destiny trilogy, both when I first read it years ago and in my most recent re-read. The action sequences are among the best in Star Trek, and the character moments work very well for the most part. I found the Columbia sequences to be equal parts heartbreaking and horrifying. It's clear from the very start that this is a very tightly-plotted story, with twists and turns that readers will not see coming. At the same time, the story is pure Star Trek through and through. If you haven't read Destiny yet, do yourself a favor and put it on your list immediately; this is Trek lit at its absolute finest, and the best is still yet to come.

More about Gods of Night:



Also by David Mack:

My next read:

Next up is my review of the novelization of Star Trek: The Motion Picture, recently re-released for that film's 40th anniversary!

Wednesday, October 30, 2019

The Antares Maelstrom

Star Trek: The Original Series
The Antares Maelstrom by Greg Cox
Release date: August 13th 2019
Read August 14th 2019


Previous book (The Original Series): The Captain's Oath
Next book (The Original Series): The Motion Picture: 40th Anniversary Edition


Purchase:
Trade Paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk
E-book (Kindle): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

Publisher's description:
The final frontier erupts into chaos as vast quantities of a rare energy source are discovered beneath the surface of Baldur-3, a remote planet beyond the outer fringes of Federation space. Now an old-fashioned "gold rush" is underway as a flood of would-be prospectors, from countless worlds and species, races toward the planet to stake their claim.

The galactic stampede threatens the stability of neighboring planets and space stations, as widespread strife and sabotage and all-around pandemonium result in a desperate need for Starfleet assistance. Captain James T. Kirk and the crew of the Starship Enterprise are dispatched to deal with the escalating crisis... which lies on the other side of a famously perilous region of space known as the Antares Maelstrom.

My thoughts:

Click here to watch my video review of The Original Series: The Antares Maelstrom, or click play on the embedded video below!



Final thoughts:

A fun TOS story that makes numerous callbacks to original Star Trek episodes. Every member of the main cast is given an interesting part to play, and the story feels like a good old-fashioned TOS adventure. While some may bristle at the large number of plotlines the story juggles, I found myself enjoying each one. A great entry in the long-running TOS book line!

More about The Antares Maelstrom:



Also by Greg Cox:

Next time on Trek Lit Reviews:

My next review is for the first book in the Star Trek: Destiny trilogy by David Mack: Gods of Night.


Monday, October 28, 2019

Literary Treks 286: The Wrong Thing for the Right Reason

Star Trek: The Next Generation
Collateral Damage
Exclusive interview with author David Mack!

Purchase Collateral Damage:
Trade Paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk
E-book (Kindle): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

Eight years ago, Captain Jean-Luc Picard was party to events that led to the ouster and eventual assassination of disgraced Federation President Min Zife. Now, he must return to Earth to face the music in a hearing called to determine his culpability in those events. Meanwhile, the Enterprise, under the command of Worf, must deal with a determined enemy in possession of a weapon capable of inflicting unimaginable damage on the Federation.

In this episode of Literary Treks, hosts Dan Gunther and Bruce Gibson are once again joined by author David Mack to discuss his most recent novel, Star Trek: The Next Generation: Collateral Damage. We talk about wrapping up the loose ends of Tezwa, the inspiration for the Nausicaans' plight, the unique literary devices used in this novel, a Starfleet Intelligence spin-off, Worf's development as a character, Lieutenant Aneta Šmrhová, Picard's hearing and eventual fate, and wrap up with where David can be found online and what he is working on now.

At the top of the show, we respond to listener feedback from The Babel Conference with your thoughts on Literary Treks 284: Smoothing Over the Rough Edges of Canon.


Literary Treks 286: The Wrong Thing for the Right Reason
TNG: Collateral Damage - Exclusive interview with author David Mack!





Previous episode: Literary Treks 285: Those Bloody Mind Control Revolts!
Next episode: Literary Treks 287: Fear Usually Leads to Chaos

Friday, October 25, 2019

Greater Than the Sum

Star Trek: The Next Generation
Greater Than the Sum by Christopher L. Bennett
Published July 2008
Read September 29th 2019

Previous book (The Next Generation): Before Dishonor
Next book (Post-Nemesis Continuity): Destiny, Book I: Gods of Night


Purchase:
Mass-market paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk
E-book (Kindle): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

Spoilers ahead for Greater Than the Sum
!

From the back cover:
The Starship Rhea has discovered a cluster of carbon planets that seems to be the source of the quantum energies rippling through a section of space. A landing party finds unusual life-forms inhabiting one of the planets. One officer, Lieutenant T'Ryssa Chen -- a half-Vulcan -- makes a tenuous connection with them. But before any progress can be made, the Rhea comes under attack from the Einstein -- a Starfleet vessel now controlled by the Borg. The landing party can only listen in horror as their comrades are assimilated. The Borg descend to the planet, and just as Chen accepts that she will be assimilated, the lieutenant is whisked two thousand light-years away.

A quantum slipstream -- instantaneous transportation -- is controlled by these beings in the cluster, and in the heart of the cluster there is now a Borg ship. Cut off from the rest of the Borg collective, the Einstein cannot be allowed to rejoin it. For the sake of humanity, the Borg cannot gain access to quantum slipstream technology.

Starfleet Command gives Captain Picard carte blanche: do whatever he must to help the beings in the cluster, and stop the Einstein no matter the cost.

My thoughts:

The fallout from the previous novels continues as the U.S.S. Rhea is attacked by the assimilated U.S.S. Einstein (see: Before Dishonor). A landing party from the Rhea investigating a nearby planet is also attacked and seemingly all killed, with one exception: Lieutenant T'Ryssa Chen, who is spirited away to a planet many light years distant. It seems that the alien lifeform encountered by the away team has the ability to send people and objects vast distances via quantum slipstream, a capability that must be kept out of the hands of the Borg at all costs.

The Borg once again threaten the Federation, with the latest menace from Resistance and Before Dishonor still not yet completely dealt with.

Chen joins the crew of the Enterprise on its long journey back to the star cluster the Rhea was investigating, hoping to make contact with the lifeform there and convince it to not share its knowledge with the Borg. However, the alien nature of the lifeform may mean its sympathies lie with the Collective over the loose conglomeration of individuals that make up the Federation.

On the way back to the star cluster, the Enterprise encounters a familiar ally: Hugh, and his breakaway Borg faction who were cut off from the Collective. Aiding them in their fight against the Borg, Hugh's forces are now made up of not just the Borg we see in TNG's "Descent" two-parter, but the Borg who were able to escape the Collective thanks to the "Unimatrix Zero" debacle in Star Trek: Voyager. This was an interesting turn for the story to take. First of all, it was great to see Hugh again, and to be able to catch up with what he and his fellow disconnected drones have been up to. This part of the story also allowed the author to explore a huge issue in Picard's life: reproduction. The breakaway Borg want Dr. Crusher to assist them in being able to procreate, a topic that carries a lot of baggage for Picard, who isn't sure about bringing a child into the world with the Borg as a resurgent threat. Dr. Crusher, to whom Picard was recently married, does want children, and the topic is a point of contention with the couple.

Hugh leads "The Liberated," former members of the Borg Collective who have broken away and live as individuals.

Each Star Trek author currently writing has areas in which they are known to excel. David Mack, for example, has become known for huge, sweeping epics. Una McCormack delivers stunning political and cultural commentary. Dayton Ward gives us strong, character-driven plots with a familiarity that makes his Trek feel like home. As for Christopher L. Bennett, I would contend that one of his areas of expertise lies in making strong canon connections and making this whole Star Trek thing feel like a cohesive universe.

Star Trek has never been just one person's vision. Rather, it is an amalgam of the ideas of hundreds of writers, all contributing to a vast tapestry that, at times, doesn't hold together as well as we would like it to. This, however, is where the secondary materials that make up the Star Trek universe have a chance to shine, providing the connective tissue that can potentially help to make everything make sense. Christopher L. Bennett is a master of weaving this material, and his work in Greater Than the Sum is no exception.

A number of inconsistencies have cropped up over the years in the way the Borg have been portrayed. In The Next Generation, the Borg ships were said to have been completely decentralized, with major systems distributed evenly throughout the vessels. However, in Voyager, the crew is often able to target specific systems on a Borg vessel, such as the shield generators or weapon systems. Bennett is able to provide a plausible reason for these differences in a way I had never considered, causing this seeming contradiction to make some semblance of sense. Similarly, the differences in the nature of Borg we have seen over the years (androgynous unassimilated drones vs. assimilated gendered drones) is explained quite deftly by the author as well. In recent years (and indeed, throughout Star Trek history), many Trek fans have taken a perverse delight in nitpicking and tearing apart the choices of the writers and producers. However, I believe there is much more fun to be had in trying to explain those inconsistencies in a way that makes the Trek universe feel more cohesive. Christopher Bennett clearly shares in that delight, and he has become quite good at it!

Christopher L. Bennett is able to reconcile the various inconsistencies that have cropped up over the years in how the Borg have been portrayed in Star Trek.

Ultimately, the final showdown with the Borg involves an heroic sacrifice by Hugh, who gives his life to deliver a killing blow to the Borg: a "multi-vector agent" (MVA) that combines a number of attacks on the Collective into a nano-virus that is designed to incapacitate the Borg. The attack proves successful, and it seems that the Federation now has an effective tool with which to combat the Collective. However, at the end of the novel, the Borg begin attacking the Federation en masse. In one of the first engagements, Lieutenant Leybenzon, former security chief of the Enterprise, loses the weapon to the Borg in an act of extreme hubris, giving the Collective the ability to adapt to the weapon before it can be used to defend the Federation.

And thus, Star Trek: Destiny begins...

Final thoughts:

I really enjoyed Greater Than the Sum. Going into it, I thought "not the Borg AGAIN!," but this turned out to be a very thoughtful and compelling story, unlike Resistance and Before Dishonor, both of which were disappointments. Christopher L. Bennett gives us a unique take on the Borg, which is difficult at this point, and also sets the story up nicely for the apocalyptic events of Star Trek: Destiny. Top marks for this novel from me; Bennett delivers not only an action-filled thriller, but a perfect character-driven story that gets to heart of what it means to be human. What more can you ask for from Star Trek?

More about Greater Than the Sum:

Also by Christopher L. Bennett:

My next read:

Next up is my long-overdue video review of The Original Series: The Antares Maelstrom by Greg Cox. See you next time!

Monday, October 21, 2019

Literary Treks 285: Those Bloody Mind Control Revolts!

Star Trek: The Motion Picture
by Gene Roddenberry
40th Anniversary Edition

Purchase:
Trade Paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

A destructive menace is heading directly towards Earth, and the Enterprise is the only starship in interception range. Admiral James T. Kirk must once again assume command to take on this threat and solve the mystery of "Veejur" before it destroys all life on Earth. The film that launched the Star Trek movie series has mixed reviews, but the novelization of that film offers us a glimpse into the mind of the creator of Star Trek!

In this episode of Literary Treks, hosts Bruce Gibson and Dan Gunther are joined by "Dr. Trek" himself, Larry Nemecek, to discuss the novelization of Star Trek: The Motion Picture by Gene Roddenberry. We talk about differences between the film and the novel, the persistent "Alan Dean Foster myth," Kirk's subtextual relationship with Spock, the story from Veejur's perspective, Decker's ultimate fate, and wrap up with our final thoughts and ratings.

In the news segment, we report on the announcement of Star Trek: The Motion Picture: Inside the Art & Visual Effects by Jeff Bond & Gene Kozicki, coming in March of 2020. We also respond to listener feedback from the Babel Conference for Literary Treks 283: Everyone's Tilting at Windmills.


Literary Treks 285: Those Bloody Mind Control Revolts!
Star Trek: The Motion Picture Novelization by Gene Roddenberry - 40th Anniversary Edition





Previous episode: Literary Treks 284: Smoothing Over the Rough Edges of Canon
Next episode: Literary Treks 286: The Wrong Thing for the Right Reason

Monday, October 14, 2019

Literary Treks 284: Smoothing Over the Rough Edges of Canon

Star Trek: The Next Generation
Greater Than the Sum
by Christopher L. Bennett

Purchase:
Mass-market Paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk
E-book (Kindle): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk

In recent months, the Borg have returned again and again to threaten the peace of the Federation. Now, Picard and his crew must team up with unexpected allies to prevent the Borg from acquiring quantum slipstream technology, an advancement that would give the Borg unprecedented power to assimilate the Federation. Along with a new and untested crewmember, the men and women under Captain Picard's command face incredible odds in their latest round with the Borg.

In this episode of Literary Treks, hosts Dan Gunther and Bruce Gibson discuss the TNG novel Greater Than the Sum by Christopher L. Bennett. We talk about Lieutenant T'Ryssa Chen, Christopher Bennett's amazing ability to "fix" glitches in Star Trek continuity, a star cluster filled with strange new worlds, an old friend named Hugh, a plan to destroy the Borg once and for all, the ending that leads into David Mack's Destiny trilogy, how this story jives with what we know about Star Trek: Picard, and wrap up with our final thoughts and ratings.

At the top of the show, we respond to listener feedback from The Babel Conference for Literary Treks 282: And Then Wonder Woman Shows Up!


Literary Treks 284: Smoothing Over the Rough Edges of Canon
The Next Generation: Greater Than the Sum by Christopher L. Bennett





Previous episode: Literary Treks 283: Everyone's Tilting at Windmills
Next episode: Literary Treks 285: Those Bloody Mind Control Revolts!

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

Release Day! TNG: Collateral Damage by David Mack

Star Trek: The Next Generation
Collateral Damage
by David Mack

It's already been showing up on bookshelves, but today is the official release day for the latest entry in the ongoing Star Trek saga: Star Trek: The Next Generation: Collateral Damage by David Mack!

Continuing the fallout from Section 31's exposure in Control, this novel sees Captain Jean-Luc Picard return to Earth to face the consequences of his actions in the ouster (and subsequent assassination) of disgraced Federation President Min Zife.

I'm very much looking forward to reading this one, and you can be assured we will be covering it on an upcoming episode of the Literary Treks podcast, as well as here on Trek Lit Reviews!

Check out below for the back-cover blurb and links to purchase from Amazon.




Publisher's description:
From the New York Times bestselling author of Star Trek: Discovery: Desperate Hours comes an original, thrilling novel set in the universe of Star Trek: The Next Generation!

The past returns to haunt Captain Jean-Luc Picard—a crime he thought long buried has been exposed, and he must return to Earth to answer for his role in a conspiracy that some call treason. Meanwhile, the U.S.S. Enterprise is sent to apprehend pirates who have stolen vital technology from a fragile Federation colony. But acting captain Commander Worf discovers that the pirates’ motives are not what they seem, and that sometimes standing for justice means defying the law….

Purchase Star Trek: The Next Generation: Collateral Damage:

Trade Paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk
E-book (Kindle): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk


Next Release: Discovery: Dead Endless

Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Release Day! The Motion Picture Novelization: 40th Anniversary Edition!

Star Trek: The Motion Picture
by Gene Roddenberry
40th Anniversary Edition

Available today is a re-release of the only Star Trek novel penned by the creator of Trek, Gene Roddenberry! Pick up the 40th anniversary edition of the novelization of Star Trek: The Motion Picture in trade paperback edition wherever you buy books.

Check out below for the back-cover blurb and links to purchase from Amazon!




Publisher's description:
Celebrate the 40th anniversary of Star Trek: The Motion Picture with this classic movie novelization written by legendary Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry!

The original five-year mission of the Starship Enterprise to explore strange new worlds and to seek out new life and new civilizations has ended. Now James T. Kirk, Spock, Dr. McCoy, and the rest of the crew of the Enterprise have separated to follow their own career paths and different lives. But now, an overwhelming alien threat—one that is ignoring all attempts at communication and annihilating all opposition in its path—is on a collision course with Earth, the very heart of the United Federation of Planets. And the only vessel that Starfleet can send in time to intercept this menace is a refitted Enterprise, with her old crew heeding the call to once again boldly go where no one has gone before….

Purchase Star Trek: The Motion Picture: 40th Anniversary Edition:

Trade Paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk


Next Release: The Next Generation: Collateral Damage

Monday, September 30, 2019

Literary Treks 283: Everyone's Tilting at Windmills

Star Trek: The Next Generation
Vendetta
by Peter David

Purchase:
Mass-market paperback: Amazon.com | Amazon.ca | Amazon.co.uk
E-book (Kindle): Amazon.com | Amazon.ca

The Borg: the Federation's most lethal adversary. A force of nature, nearly unstoppable, and the harbinger of doom for any civilization unfortunate enough to come to the attention of this cybernetic menace. The crew of the Enterprise thwarted their attack on the Federation once; but now, when this relentless enemy comes again in force, can the Federation once again be saved?

In this episode of Literary Treks, hosts Bruce Gibson and Dan Gunther discuss the TNG novel Vendetta by Peter David. We talk about Picard's mysterious connection to a woman with a vendetta, the horrors of a Borg attack, Geordi's quixotic role in the novel, new types of Borg, Picard's rival, the Doomsday Machine, the theme of Vendetta, how this book compares to its sequel, Before Dishonor, and wrap up with our final thoughts and ratings.

In the news section, we talk about a number of new releases: issue #2 of Star Trek: Aftermath, the 40th anniversary edition of the novelization of Star Trek: The Motion Picture by Gene Roddenberry, and Star Trek: The Next Generation: Collateral Damage by David Mack. We also review issue #6 of Star Trek: Year Five, and respond to listener feedback from the Babel Conference for Literary Treks 281: The Next Evolutionary Step of the Borg.


Literary Treks 283: Everyone's Tilting at Windmills
Star Trek: The Next Generation: Vendetta by Peter David





Previous episode: Literary Treks 282: And Then Wonder Woman Shows Up!
Next episode: Literary Treks 284: Smoothing Over the Rough Edges of Canon